Wednesday, September 28, 2016

LOGIC. WHAT ARE DEDUCTIVE AND INDUCTIVE ARGUMENTS? PART 1.


Classroom, Math, Chalkboard, School

You Have Probably Heard These Terms Used Many Times.
Perhaps it was the Classroom, Job Site, or even Television/Movies.

However, were they used Correctly?  

To Introduce this Section, Let's Start with a Couple of Examples.

In a Valid Deductive Argument, if the Premises are True,
THE CONCLUSION MUST BE TRUE.

Here is an Example of a Valid Deductive Argument;

All Politicians are Deceitful People.

All Deceitful People can't be Trusted.


Therefore, All Politicians can't Be Trusted.



Now a Valid Inductive Argument;

Most Politicians Never Tell the Truth.

Our Congressman Promises to Not Raise Taxes.


Therefore, Our Congressman will Probably Raise Taxes.


An Inductive Argument Points to the Probability of the 
Conclusion Being True, but it is not a Certainty.


IN THE NEXT POST ON THIS TOPIC, WE'LL EXAMINE SUCH
TERMS AS VALID/INVALID, WHICH INDICATE IF THE ARGUMENT 
IS LAID OUT, OR CONSTRUCTED CORRECTLY.  THAT, AND WHY 
EXAMINING THE TRUTH OF THE PREMISES IS THE KEY TO 
EVALUATING THE STRENGTH OR WEAKNESS OF EACH ARGUMENT.

(ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED ON 7/8/2015)