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Saturday, January 5, 2019

APA CONNECT- General Discussion Digest for Friday January 4, 2019.

American Philosophical Association

General Discussion

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Jan 4, 2019
started 12 hours ago, Michael Kazanjian (0 replies)
Toward Redefining Metaphysics   external link to thread view
1. Traditional metaphysics involves the subjec... Michael Kazanjian
started yesterday, Laurie Shrage (3 replies)
What led you to philosophy?   external link to thread view
2. Three hopes. The hope that there is a... Jeremy Bendik-Keymer
3. The idea of "pursuing philosophy as a vocation"... Julie Ward
4. I enrolled at Columbia in 1959, intending to... Michael Goldman
started yesterday, James Sennett (3 replies)
Teaching Business Ethics   external link to thread view
5. This is great, John! Thank you very much. ---... James Sennett
6. Your kindness is appreciated. Maybe you will be... John Corcoran


 
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1.Toward Redefining Metaphysics
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Michael Kazanjian
Jan 4, 2019 11:40 AM
Michael Kazanjian
Traditional metaphysics involves the subjec-object relation. In the spectrum, positivism means object without subject, embodied object, and so on, toward subject alone. I am influenced by human factors engineering, Huston Smith, Kenneth Boulding, mereology, henology, and their implications. This leads to traditional metaphysics becomes what i call ontology, and a new, more general, more abstract metaphysics becoming the structure-limit relationship. I have done three books, the latest is Unified Philosophy: Interdisciplinary Metaphysics, Cyberethics, and Liberal Arts.  Philosophy, as Mary Midgley and Whitehead note, is metadiscipline or critique of abstractions, respectively.
mkazanjian@sbcglobal.net

------------------------------
Michael Kazanjian
Instructor
Triton College
Chicago IL
773-463-8908
------------------------------
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2.Re: What led you to philosophy?
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Jeremy Bendik-Keymer
Jan 4, 2019 11:39 AM
Jeremy Bendik-Keymer
Three hopes.

The hope that there is a practice where people ask intellectually and emotionally sharp questions that can improve how we conceptualize our world, not just intellectually, but practically and relationally.  The hope that people can improve the humanity and thoughtfulness of a world into which they are plunged.  The hope that I would meet a community of people interested in the objects of the first two hopes.

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Jeremy Bendik-Keymer
Cleveland OH
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-------------------------------------------
Original Message:
Sent: 01-03-2019 15:55
From: Laurie Shrage
Subject: What led you to philosophy?

What led you to pursue philosophy as a vocation?

I started college as an art and French major at UC Davis, where for a brief time I studied with the sculptor Robert Arneson. Perhaps my interests in French culture led me to take a course from Marjorie Grene on Sartre and Merleau-Ponty. I lacked all forms of intellectual sophistication, and remember sitting in Grene's office asking questions about "Ponty," and Grene would lean over her desk and look me directly in the eyes and say "Merleau-Ponty." I switched my major to Philosophy, because I thought it would be more practical than studying art and French! I also liked math in high school and the study of logic afforded the same pleasures without the risk of "social death," which a girl interested in math faced back then.  Although I found the books and courses in Philosophy often baffling, my Philosophy professors had the ability to look beyond the distracting details of an issue and raise the relevant and important questions. Philosophy allowed me to pursue many different kinds of interests, from the nature of art, feminist politics, the authority of science and religion, and so on. I didn't think about grad school until two of my classmates entered philosophy graduate programs, and they encouraged me to apply. I also didn't think much about what I would, or could, do with a Ph.D until, somewhere in the middle of grad school, I began to realize the opportunities that having an advanced degree opened up. I very much enjoyed the university environment and figured I would just keep on this track as long as I could, and I feel fortunate to have landed in a profession in which I can hang out with learned and intellectually curious, and occasionally irascible, colleagues and students.

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Laurie Shrage
Professor
Gainesville FL
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3.Re: What led you to philosophy?
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Julie Ward
Jan 4, 2019 12:36 PM
Julie Ward
The idea of "pursuing philosophy as a vocation" doesn't fit my recollection of entering the discipline: I ended up here by a series of happy mishaps, not intentional design. Like Laurie Shrage, I began with a different focus in college, Literature, and especially, Jorge Luis Borges.  This interest receded my sophomore year when I took my first Philosophy class, and the teacher posed the question about our knowledge of the unobserved, not anything supernatural, but in this case, about the hallway outside the classroom. I was hooked. I changed my major. Midway through the Philosophy major, with fellow students hearing from parents about the impracticality of Philosophy as a major, I confessed that I didn't know what "to do" with Philosophy to my best friend's mother; her reply was straight from ancient Greek thought, "You do your life with it, that's all." That sounded about as persuasive as I needed and I finished the major. A few years out, after bouncing around in odd jobs that college graduates often take, I re-thought the pull to Philosophy, applied to graduate schools, and entered UCSD. In my recollection, my graduate training coincided with a letter from the APA stating the profession was in dire straits and that Philosophy Ph.D. students might do well to go elsewhere. Many of us did. I stayed, in part due to some accidental events that pushed me back onto the path of philosophy. So, my pursuit of the discipline seems less like deliberate choice and more like fortunate accident, but enjoyable, nevertheless.

------------------------------
[Julie Ward]
[Professor]
[Loyola University Chicago]
[Chicago, IL]
------------------------------
-------------------------------------------
Original Message:
Sent: 01-03-2019 15:55
From: Laurie Shrage
Subject: What led you to philosophy?

What led you to pursue philosophy as a vocation?

I started college as an art and French major at UC Davis, where for a brief time I studied with the sculptor Robert Arneson. Perhaps my interests in French culture led me to take a course from Marjorie Grene on Sartre and Merleau-Ponty. I lacked all forms of intellectual sophistication, and remember sitting in Grene's office asking questions about "Ponty," and Grene would lean over her desk and look me directly in the eyes and say "Merleau-Ponty." I switched my major to Philosophy, because I thought it would be more practical than studying art and French! I also liked math in high school and the study of logic afforded the same pleasures without the risk of "social death," which a girl interested in math faced back then.  Although I found the books and courses in Philosophy often baffling, my Philosophy professors had the ability to look beyond the distracting details of an issue and raise the relevant and important questions. Philosophy allowed me to pursue many different kinds of interests, from the nature of art, feminist politics, the authority of science and religion, and so on. I didn't think about grad school until two of my classmates entered philosophy graduate programs, and they encouraged me to apply. I also didn't think much about what I would, or could, do with a Ph.D until, somewhere in the middle of grad school, I began to realize the opportunities that having an advanced degree opened up. I very much enjoyed the university environment and figured I would just keep on this track as long as I could, and I feel fortunate to have landed in a profession in which I can hang out with learned and intellectually curious, and occasionally irascible, colleagues and students.

------------------------------
Laurie Shrage
Professor
Gainesville FL
------------------------------
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4.Re: What led you to philosophy?
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Michael Goldman
Jan 4, 2019 3:22 PM
Michael Goldman
I enrolled at Columbia in 1959, intending to spend three years in the College and two in the School of Engineering, earning two degrees in preparation for a career as an engineer. The College had a rigorous core curriculum including a year-long sequence in "contemporary civilization," by which they then meant European culture as seen by 19th and 20th century white male academics.  (It has subsequently been re-designed to be more inclusive.)  The course was taught by faculty from a variety of disciplines and I was lucky enough to draw the late Sidney Morgenbesser for one semester. His way of looking at the texts, both philosophical and non-philosophical, was a revelation to me, and apparently struck a philosophical chord in me that I was unaware I had.   Because my program of study was very circumscribed I had little opportunity for further philosophy courses, at least for two years.  Instead I started to read paperback copies of Descartes, Kant, and other major figures.  Because I had no formal classes I was able to happily misinterpret almost everything, with no one to tell me I was mistaken.  This was a good thing, since had my misunderstandings been regularly corrected I might have been discouraged from further reading. Eventually I gave up the plan to spend the two years studying engineering and so had considerable time for more philosophy courses, by now having the intellectual courage not to be daunted by my own errors.  While I did not have enough credits to be considered a major I had enough to be accepted at Brown for graduate work.  It was a congenial environment and I finished the formal coursework in three years, and began teaching at C. W. Post College in 1966.  Four years later I moved to Miami, also a congenial environment, and retired in 2008.


------------------------------
Michael Goldman
Professor Emeritus
Miami University
Philadelphia PA
------------------------------
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-------------------------------------------
Original Message:
Sent: 01-04-2019 11:55
From: Julie Ward
Subject: What led you to philosophy?

The idea of "pursuing philosophy as a vocation" doesn't fit my recollection of entering the discipline: I ended up here by a series of happy mishaps, not intentional design. Like Laurie Shrage, I began with a different focus in college, Literature, and especially, Jorge Luis Borges.  This interest receded my sophomore year when I took my first Philosophy class, and the teacher posed the question about our knowledge of the unobserved, not anything supernatural, but in this case, about the hallway outside the classroom. I was hooked. I changed my major. Midway through the Philosophy major, with fellow students hearing from parents about the impracticality of Philosophy as a major, I confessed that I didn't know what "to do" with Philosophy to my best friend's mother; her reply was straight from ancient Greek thought, "You do your life with it, that's all." That sounded about as persuasive as I needed and I finished the major. A few years out, after bouncing around in odd jobs that college graduates often take, I re-thought the pull to Philosophy, applied to graduate schools, and entered UCSD. In my recollection, my graduate training coincided with a letter from the APA stating the profession was in dire straits and that Philosophy Ph.D. students might do well to go elsewhere. Many of us did. I stayed, in part due to some accidental events that pushed me back onto the path of philosophy. So, my pursuit of the discipline seems less like deliberate choice and more like fortunate accident, but enjoyable, nevertheless.

------------------------------
[Julie Ward]
[Professor]
[Loyola University Chicago]
[Chicago, IL]



 
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5.Re: Teaching Business Ethics
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James Sennett
Jan 4, 2019 11:39 AM
James Sennett
This is great, John! Thank you very much.

------------------------------
James Sennett
Professor of Business Ethics
Brenau University
Fairburn GA 30263
(678) 827-7305
jsennett@brenau.edu
------------------------------
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-------------------------------------------
Original Message:
Sent: 01-03-2019 13:31
From: John Corcoran
Subject: Teaching Business Ethics

This can be read aloud in class by students. It helps to connect ethics to the logic needed for effective action.

John Corcoran 1989. The Inseparability of Logic and Ethics, Free Inquiry, Spring, 37–40.

www.academia.edu/9413409/...

This essay takes logic and ethics in broad senses: logic as the science of evidence; ethics as the science of justice. One of its main conclusions is that neither science can be fruitfully pursued without the virtues fostered by the other: logic is pointless without fairness and compassion; ethics is pointless without rigor and objectivity. The logician's advice to be dispassionate is in resonance and harmony with the ethicist's advice us to be compassionate.

11 Translations posted: Arabic, Dutch, Greek, Italian, Korean, Portuguese, Persian, Russian, Spanish, Turkish, and Ukrainian.

------------------------------
John Corcoran
Bradenton FL
941 756 8751



 
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6.Re: Teaching Business Ethics
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John Corcoran
Jan 4, 2019 3:23 PM
John Corcoran
Your kindness is appreciated. Maybe you will be able to use the following companion piece.

TEACHING CRITICAL THINKING THROUGH PEDAGOGICAL LICENSE

J. CORCORAN. 1999. Critical thinking and pedagogical license. Manuscrito XXII, 109–116.

This approach gets the student to feel the need for critical thinking as an antidote to indoctrination.

Critical thinking involves deliberate application of tests and standards to beliefs per se and to methods used to arrive at beliefs. Pedagogical license is authorization accorded to teachers permitting them to use otherwise illicit means in order to achieve pedagogical goals. Pedagogical license is thus analogous to poetic license or, more generally, to artistic license.

Pedagogical license will be found to be pervasive in college teaching. This presentation suggests that critical thinking courses emphasize two topics: first, the nature and usefulness of critical thinking; second, the nature and pervasiveness of pedagogical license. Awareness of pedagogical license alerts the student to the need for critical thinking.

www.academia.edu/s/b4e6f287ec/...



www.academia.edu/37643592/...

Translations: Arabic, Dutch, Greek, Persian, and Spanish.

Forthcoming: Chinese, Italian, Korean, Portuguese, Romanian, and Turkish.

------------------------------
John Corcoran
Bradenton FL
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-------------------------------------------
Original Message:
Sent: 01-04-2019 10:58
From: James Sennett
Subject: Teaching Business Ethics

This is great, John! Thank you very much.

------------------------------
James Sennett
Professor of Business Ethics
Brenau University
Fairburn GA 30263
(678) 827-7305
jsennett@brenau.edu